Do Your Homework

So you have been called for an interview with a company. You have prepared all your technical knowledge, got a nice suit and a decent haircut.

All ready to go then. But have you done your research?

Do you actually know what the company does? What it stands for? The latest news release or why they are even hiring?

If you don’t then you need to find out.

You must treat your interview preparation with all due care and attention, if you want the job that is.

First place to go is the company website. Check out what they say about themselves, any key players and recent news. Check on Google for news stories about the company.

Are they buying out anyone else, have they won new business or have they issued a profits warning? All valuable information.

Check out their social media if they have any. Facebook pages, Tweets and LinkedIn page. Do they have any critics or fan sites? Are any of their employees maintaining their own blogs?

Be prepared to answer the following questions:

  • What do you know about what we do?
  • Did you read about our recent news in the press?
  • What do you know about the role?
  • What industry do we work in?

Best of luck.

Paul Browning

9 Responses to “Do Your Homework”

  1. This is great advice. I know from my own experience that it is always a good idea to educate yourself as much as possible about the company you are trying to work for. In my opinion, people that are educated about the company they are applying for are more likely to get hired. Someone who doesn’t take the time to learn all they can about the company may seem to not care as much as someone who has.

  2. Napoleon Hill also has the same tactic in his book. This is certainly one of the ways to land a job and can even land you the position you desire. check it out!

  3. People get flattered easily, the more you know about them the more they feel cherished and admired. The more information you get the more tools you have in your shed.

  4. I Apply Dating techniques to Job interviews and im almost always right when I determine that I am going to apply for the Job. It doesn’t matter if the interviewer is male or female. Everyone has an ego, you just need to know where to peg.

  5. Great advice. I’m helping my sister hunt for a job right now and know this to be true. Whether you’re applying for a permanent job or presenting yourself as a contractor, you must be knowledgeable about the company and its latest activities. You might not need to bring all of that information up in an interview (in fact you probably shouldn’t), but it will enable you to respond to comments with authority, and to ask pertinent questions.

  6. As you implied Paul, the social media tools available today can provide a wealth of information about a company. Some firms do have Facebook pages and many more have Twitter accounts. You can follow them on Twitter or just search for mention of the company name to see what’s being said by others.

  7. I should have mentioned LinkedIn as well. You have to work a little harder on LinkedIn to build a network of people to communicate with, and that’s the sort of thing you should be doing *before* you need to rather than after. But the LinkedIn “companies” tab can provide you some unique information about the company, as well as general information such as you might find on their website as well. You can also follow the company on LinkedIn.

    • Could you tell me more about using LinkedIn for company research? What do you find most useful?

      • LinkedIn compiles a little bit of the different kinds of information Paul mentioned in his post. You’ll find a general description, a few current news stories, how many LinkedIn members are employed by that company and what their relationship is to you, job listings if any, and other information. The “companies” tab is in beta with LinkedIn right now; hopefully it will stay 🙂

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